May 13, 2002

... the Internet radically redefines a person's psychological relationship to time and space. Attention is rivetted on what is tangible, useful, instantly available; the stimulus for deeper thought and reflection may be lacking. Yet human beings have a vital need for time and inner quiet to ponder and examine life and its mysteries, and to grow gradually into a mature dominion of themselves and of the world around them. [*]

That was from the Pope, in a message urging the Church to get into the internet (but to also beware of its limitations). David Weinberger has an interesting response, highlighting the difference between seeing proclaiming a message and engaging in conversation. The Holy Father seems keen on the former, without showing much enthusiasm for the latter.

What is it with the "parchment" background image on Papal pages on the net? It looks kitsch.


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I’m Greg Restall, and this is my personal website. I teach philosophy and logic as Professor of Philosophy at the University of Melbourne. ¶ Start at the home page of this site—a compendium of recent additions around here—and go from there to learn more about who I am and what I do. ¶ This is my personal site on the web. Nothing here is in any way endorsed by the University of Melbourne.

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